A third of SMEs believe local government support has deteriorated

Mike Egan, owner of Wellington's Monsoon Poon, says local government has a big effect on business.

Monique Ford / Stuff

Mike Egan, owner of Wellington’s Monsoon Poon, says local government has a big effect on business.

New Zealand’s small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are ready to exercise their democratic rights over the coming weeks, with more than nine in 10 respondents saying they plan to vote in the upcoming local elections.

It comes after MYOB’s latest SME Snapshot – a survey of more than 570 SMEs across the country – found that 45% of business owners and decision makers thought support from small business advice had not changed in the past three years, while a third believed it was worse.

Wellington restaurant owner Monsoon Poon Mike Egan said local government was having a big effect on business.

“For us to have a sustainable business, we need a city that provides an environment that can meet the expectations and needs of our customers and employees. A city in which all aspects are improved or even simply maintained,” he said.

READ MORE:
* Forget big business, the spotlight is on SMEs to help with economic recovery
* Small and medium business dissatisfaction with government declines during lockdown
* Government rescue package is a lifeline for small businesses

This included things like safety, cleanliness, functionality, events, and a common vision for the city, all of which affected business.

The survey found that 93% of SME owners and decision-makers plan to vote this year, with many acknowledging the influence of local government on the future of their community.

THINGS

Susan Edmunds, editor of Stuff Business, joins Small Business Minister Stuart Nash to talk about how the small business sector is doing.

Jo Tozer, spokesperson for MYOB, said SMEs often feel the effects of local decision-making more directly.

“It’s not uncommon for SME owners to become more involved in their region. They are passionate about making changes and improvements that will benefit not just businesses, but their community as a whole.

“This election will be important to them, and with increased awareness of the results and the decisions for which local councils are responsible, it is clear that they are ready to have a say in who they think should make the decisions. front,” she said.

Jo Tozer says SMEs at the heart of local communities often feel the impacts of local decision-making most directly.

Provided

Jo Tozer says SMEs at the heart of local communities often feel the impacts of local decision-making most directly.

More than a third (37%) of business owners and decision makers surveyed said they felt connected to their local council, while 32% felt disconnected. The rest (32%) felt neither.

Some survey respondents said their local councils did not communicate with them, or that no action was taken after contacting the council about something, and they were not kept informed. work likely to have an impact on their business.

Asked whether their local elected officials have made an effort to seek the views of the business community, most SMEs surveyed (39%) felt so, with just over a quarter (27%) felt that they had not made a great effort to gather the opinion. from the local business community, while 10% said they had made no effort.

SME owners have been clear on the areas they would like to see prioritized for further action over the next three years.

At the top of the list were roads, with more than half (58%) saying they would like this to become a priority, followed by infrastructure (55%), water and wastewater management (44 %) and public transport services (37%). ).